Book Review: Hannah Jewell’s 100 Nasty Women of History will help you find your new favourite historical figure

Join The Washington Post’s pop culture editor Hannah Jewell as she plucks (almost) forgotten women from the historical cutting room floor. From artists to investigative reporters, scientists to queens, political firebrands to murderers, there’s no such thing as the delicate fairer sex here. Get in the kitchen and make you sandwich? Puh-lease. I’ve got an empire to overthrow.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Immerse yourself in the hunt for Australia’s deadliest snake with Brendan James Murray’s Venom

In the first half of the twentieth century, the Australian media began spreading tales of a huge, lightning fast species of snake that was seemingly taking lives at a rate of knots. Attaining a near mythical status, the nguman, or taipan, was all too real. The press demonised them, wary farmers hunted them, and desperate herpetologists tried to capture them, creating the climate of near hysteria that forms the backbone of Venom, the second book from Australian writer Brendan James Murray.... Read More | Share it now!

The Melbourne Festival is officially underway, and Taylor Mac leads the charge (Performances until October 20th)

It’s astonishing to think about how much music has filled our ears and hearts over the years; and I don’t just mean the years we’ve been alive. I’m talking from day one, when Earth was created. Think about the genre discoveries, the melodies, the development of instruments, idols both past and present. Imagine, what it was like and what it meant to be a music lover back in the 17 and 1800s when I can’t even hum a melody of that time! Well, fear not for you are about to be educated in the best and most uplifting kind of way.... Read More | Share it now!

Book review: 1787 by Nick Brodie

Australia Day is a fairly contentious date in the calendar. The idea that Australia began with the arrival of the First Fleet on January 26th 1788 has long been offensive to descendants of the Indigenous Australians who already occupied the land. It also dismisses interactions between Europeans and Indigenous people that predated the landing, and it’s these encounters that form the basis of Nick Brodie‘s new book 1787: The Lost Chapters of Australia’s Beginnings.... Read More | Share it now!

The Delighted Spirit: Shakespeare at UQ (events running until November 2016)

2016 marks the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, arguably the most famous name in English literature. Ready to usher in this literary milestone, the University of Queensland has put together an impressive line-up of events. These include public lectures, symposiums, film screenings, and of course, theatrical performances, all aimed at celebrating the incredible oeuvre of a glove-maker’s son.... Read More | Share it now!