Book Review: The Not So Subtle Art Of Being A Fat Girl shows that you can succeed by embracing imperfections

Tess Holliday is a woman that knows all about obstacles. Standing at five-foot-five and wearing a size 26 in clothes, there was a time when if she’d told people she was an aspiring model their reactions would have been laughter and/or scorn. But these days she can thumb her nose at her detractors, because she is now a major social media influencer with millions of followers. She is also considered the world’s first bona fide plus-sized supermodel. In The Not So Subtle Art Of Being A Fat Girl she tells us her story with the same frank and direct manner that she exhibits in interviews, with both positive and negative results.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Shine Like It Does is a sparkly new biography about Michael Hutchence & INXS

This year marks the 20th anniversary since the death of the legendary, Michael Hutchence. In this time, a lot of books and articles have been published about this enigmatic man. A new biography, Shine Like It Does, from journalist Toby Creswell, may not be the most necessary title, but his book is an intriguing one; with Creswell managing to find the right balance between telling the truth and mere hagiography.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: And Fire Came Down by Emma Viskic is a novel about the nature of family and belonging

Author Emma Viskic is an award-winning Australian crime writer, her critically acclaimed debut novel Resurrection Bay won the 2016 Ned Kelly Award for Best First Fiction, as well as many other awards. Not only that but she’s also a classically trained clarinettist, who’s worked with Jose Carreras and Dame Kiri Te Kenawa. Her new novel, And Fire Came Down, is a reflection of modern Australia, including the Indigenous population, and sees Viskic drawing on her own experiences growing up in rural towns and cities. Indeed, Viskic’s in-depth knowledge of Indigenous culture is on show through her characters depictions. There’s racism, and white bogan hooligans, but ultimately it’s all brought together by a sense of family and belonging.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Claire Halliday’s Things My Father Taught Me is a love letter to Australian Dads

In the lead-up to Father’s Day journalist, copywriter and author, Claire Halliday follows up her previous book, Things My Mother Taught Me with one about the dads. Both books are collections of short interviews undertaken by Halliday with well-known Australian identities, where they describe the relationship they have with a parent. These range from warm and caring bonds to ones that can be a little fractured and difficult at times. This new collection, Things My Father Taught Me provides an interesting and sage look at the father-child relationship.... Read More | Share it now!

Read the first chapter of Iain Ryan’s new regional noir novel The Student

Sometimes it’s hard to know if you’re going to know if you’re going to like a novel just from looking at the cover and the synopsis. Sometimes it’s handy to read a little bit of the novel, get a feel for it… realise you love it, want to read more, and go out and by it. So in the interest of convenience we at the AU Review are supplying you with an exclusive extract of Iain Ryan’s latest regional noir The Student for your reading pleasure – the first chapter.... Read More | Share it now!