Review: National Theatre Live puts on their best work yet with YERMA (In Select Cinemas from October 14th)

Oftentimes, a contemporary theatrical work can leave a strong impression on an audience, but none more so than the modern-day adaptation of Federico García Lorca‘s YERMA. Directed and re-written by Australian Simon Stone is a radical production of this intense Lorca masterpiece. Starring Billie Piper in her Olivier Award-winning role, and joined by acclaimed Australian actor Brendan Cowell sees the highs and lows of a couple trying to fall pregnant.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Alicia Inez Guzmán’s Georgia O’Keeffe At Home explores the oeuvre of an American art icon

Famed American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is the focus of Alicia Inez Guzmán’s latest work, Georgia O’Keeffe At Home. Exploring the relationship between O’Keeffe’s location and the work she produced, Guzmán takes readers from Texas, to New York, to New Mexico, in a book that is part beautiful coffee table literature, part in depth art historical study.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: And Fire Came Down by Emma Viskic is a novel about the nature of family and belonging

Author Emma Viskic is an award-winning Australian crime writer, her critically acclaimed debut novel Resurrection Bay won the 2016 Ned Kelly Award for Best First Fiction, as well as many other awards. Not only that but she’s also a classically trained clarinettist, who’s worked with Jose Carreras and Dame Kiri Te Kenawa. Her new novel, And Fire Came Down, is a reflection of modern Australia, including the Indigenous population, and sees Viskic drawing on her own experiences growing up in rural towns and cities. Indeed, Viskic’s in-depth knowledge of Indigenous culture is on show through her characters depictions. There’s racism, and white bogan hooligans, but ultimately it’s all brought together by a sense of family and belonging.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Your Brain Knows More Than You Think is an important & contentious book about pioneering brain research

A book like Your Brain Knows More Than You Think is one that challenges you to leave your assumptions at the door. Originally written by psychologist and neurobiologist Niels Birbaumer, and translated into English by David Shaw, it provides some compelling arguments and case studies from the research and practice undertaken by Birbaumer, and others in this ground-breaking and innovative field. It’s also one that is not without controversy, but that’s because in some cases the stakes can be quite high, especially in trying to achieve things that seem impossible.... Read More | Share it now!

Melbourne Fringe Festival Review: Appropriate Kissing for All Occasions (Performances until September 30th)

A show title can make or break the moment a viewer picks your show in an epic Fringe line-up. Well, Appropriate Kissing for All Occasions certainly caught my attention and it was everything I wanted and expected. The 60-minute work is broken up into two 30-minute short pieces, with the second titled to heat you up and cool you down. Both come from ReAction Theatre, written by David Finnigan and Isab Martinez, and directed by Louise Howlett.... Read More | Share it now!

Make Nice: when creative women join forces there isn’t much they can’t accomplish (and other key lessons)

The amazing speakers at the 2017 Make Nice: Un – Conference for Creative Women.

Make Nice launched in 2016 and was born from the desire to push back against the “boys club” which exists within creative industries (most industries, let’s be honest) and show creative women they don’t have to be competitive to get ahead. Women can “make nice” and still be successful. In fact, when creative women join forces there isn’t much they can’t accomplish – a valuable lesson I took away from the conference.... Read More | Share it now!

Review: The breathtaking Parrtjima Festival lights up the red centre until October 1st

Touching down on the Alice Springs tarmac I know I’m in a special part of Australia. A town of over 25,000 people, the second largest town after Darwin in the Northern Territory and one largely influenced by its Indigenous culture. Straddling the usually dry Todd River and the Eastern and Western MacDonell Ranges, the town is often acknowledged as the red centre of Australia and it’s easy to see why.... Read More | Share it now!