Book Review: Meshel Laurie’s Buddhism for Break-ups is the Buddhist dating equivalent of Chicken Soup for the Soul

There are many people who ask themselves, “What would Jesus do?” but in the case of Meshel Laurie, it was, “What would Buddha do?” The Australian writer, comedian and radio personality was looking towards her Buddhist faith as a way of making sense of the end of her 19 year marriage. Except that there were no self-help manuals on successfully separating, not from a Buddhist standpoint, so she wrote her own and it’s a thought-provoking, relatable and compassionate read.... Read More | Share it now!

Adelaide Fringe Festival Review & Photo Gallery: Attic – Tandanya (Performances until 5th March)

Attic opens to a scene, funnily enough, of an attic. A young man rummages through forgotten treasures and starts reading a book by torchlight. Magically the room comes alive with other people who emerge from strange places. Excitedly they dig around the dress up clothes and run off to change into their new garments. Before you know it, three young men are throwing each other around and creating a human column.... Read More | Share it now!

Perth Festival Review: An Evening with an Immigrant by Inua Ellams is a consummate performance from a gifted storyteller

The house lights dim, a backing track kicks into life. Inua Ellams – poet, playwright, and performer – appears dressed in what I presume is traditional garb parading through the assembled audience. He entreats us to clap in time (naturally we do), before breaking into self-deprecating laughter. Right from the start Ellams had us in the palm of his hand, and for ninety minutes took all of us on a journey from Nigeria, to London, to Ireland and finally back to London, where for now that journey has currently halted. That journey is the story his life, told through poetry and anecdotes collected together into An Evening with an Immigrant.... Read More | Share it now!

Arts Review: Adman: Warhol before pop shows a different side to the influential artist

For most people the iconic artist, Andy Warhol is synonymous with the colourful pop art of Campbell’s soup cans, portraits of Marilyn Monroe and the record sleeves from The Velvet Underground and The Rolling Stones. What some people may not realise is that Andy Warhol was an accomplished commercial illustrator and draftsman who worked in advertising during the same period as shown in the TV series Mad Men. The Art Gallery of NSW’s Adman: Warhol before pop will educate and enlighten patrons about Warhol’s advertising work by drawing together over 300 objects, including some that have never been on public display before.... Read More | Share it now!

Theatre Review: Away is an enduring look at life, conflict & the family Christmas holiday (Sydney Opera House until 25th March)

Michael Gow’s Away is one of Australia’s most popular plays and this latest production makes it easy to see why. The current Sydney Theatre Company and Malthouse Theatre Production sees the play return to its second home at the Sydney Opera House (the show played here one year after it debuted at the Stables Theatre in 1986.) It’s a story that is in some ways deceptively simple and in others is quite layered and complex in its symbolism, imagery and references to different texts. This is a portrayal of three different Australian families going away on holiday in 1967 and one that remains an important and vital slice of home-grown theatre.... Read More | Share it now!

Adelaide Fringe Festival & Photo Gallery: Elixir – The Peacock, Gluttony (Performances until 18th March)

The opening scene of Elixir has a zombie crawling along the stage with two guys wearing hazmat suits chasing him and dragging him of stage. At this point I was wondering what I got myself into. A robotic voice comes over the loudspeaker issuing instructions to the “doctors” who now appear on stage. It is obvious at this point, as their vital statistics are measured, that this is a show that doesn’t take itself seriously.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Michael Peppiatt’s Francis Bacon in Your Blood is a fascinating exploration of the artist, the author, and a decades long friendship

As a young student in Swingin’ Sixties London, Michael Peppiatt met the star of British contemporary art, Francis Bacon. Initially just hoping to secure an interview for a university magazine, what followed was thirty years of friendship, late nights, copious amounts of champagne, and an interview that never really ended.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Helen Razer’s The Helen 100 is a brutally honest look at heartbreak and BBQ chicken

There was the bride stripped bare and now there’s the dumped stripped without a care. In The Helen 100, broadcaster and writer, Helen Razer is disarmingly honest in recounting the aftermath of the breakdown of her 15-year relationship. It’s a tale that thumbs its nose at traditional, dating self-help guides and instead offers something more funny and grounded in reality (the pain and heartbreak may be real but Razer sure does know how to make ‘em laugh).... Read More | Share it now!