Book Review: Stuart Kells’ The Library is a love letter to literature

A leading Australian bibliophile goes on a tour of thousands of libraries. The result isn’t a punchline but in fact a book called The Library by Stuart Kells. This volume is a fascinating text that draws together Kells’ scholarly essays on a range of different topics related to the storage of books, reading in general and different methods of communication through history. It’s an intriguing trip skipping through the history books and hearing about places that are so much more than a mere storeroom. For many people libraries possess a heart and soul and are a delightful sanctuary, a solace and comfort.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Pulse Points by Jennifer Down is an exploration of heartbreak in all its forms

Jennifer Down‘s book of short stories, Pulse Points, opens with a story about two men who are driving home from visiting one of their fathers at a retirement home, when they discover an injured person lying in the middle of the road. It is a shocking moment, which leaves both men reeling, and yet, the story is not about whether or not the person in the middle of the road is going to be all right or not. It’s about people, and the way that we respond to crisis, whether that crisis be the aging of our parents, or the breakdown of a relationship, or the choices people make daily about whether or not to do the right thing. These are the pulse points, the small moments that add up, and shine a light on who we are as people, and these are the threads that hold this collection together.... Read More | Share it now!

Interview: Inua Ellams talks about his play An Evening With An Immigrant, poetry and the power of art

Inua Ellams, is a Nigerian-born, award-winning poet, playwright, performer and the founder of The Midnight Run. He has published four books of poetry, including his most recent publication #Afterhours. His plays have toured internationally, and have been performed at England’s The National Theatre, the Edinburgh International Theatre Festival, and at the Perth International Arts Festival earlier this year.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: David Craig’s Defeating Terror takes us behind the scenes in the hunt for the Bali bombers

Defeating Terror is a behind the scenes look at the hunt for the Bali bombers. Although, given the nature of the book, many of the names and situations, have been altered for legal reasons. The author, David Craig, was a senior officer in the Australian Federal Police (AFP), he has trained with international forces including the FBI, and served in various countries, including Indonesia, East Timor and Afghanistan.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Helen Scheuerer’s Heart of Mist is packed with tantalising mystery and the promise of great adventures to come

In the realm of Ellest a toxic and dangerous mist swarms across the land. Here, magic is forbidden, and those who practice it are disappearing. Drinking to dampen her emerging and unwanted powers, and to forget a turbulent past, nineteen year old Bleak plans to remain firmly out of the firing line. But when the King’s men set their sights on her, she finds herself caught in the middle of a battle for power between the female warriors of the Valia and the King, corrupted by a mysterious force. Bleak cannot remain hidden anymore – either she vanishes like countless others before her, or she embraces her past and her powers, and gears up for a fight.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Fiona Horne’s The Naked Witch proves there are many feathers to a witch’s hat

Fiona Horne is a witch but she could also be considered an “onion.” In her memoir, The Naked Witch she strips away the layers and gives readers a raw and honest account of her life. This enables readers to delve deeper and deeper into different layers and just when you think you have her all figured out, she throws another bombshell or twist into the mix. In short, it’s very easy to be transfixed by her spell.... Read More | Share it now!