Book Review: Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash is a standout title, but falls flat

There’s something very appealing about translated fiction these days.  Whether it’s because more amazing novels from other languages are being translated than ever before, or whether the quality of those translations is better than it is ever has been is something an expert would need to weigh in on.  I can only comment on my reading experience as an avid reader.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Alicia Inez Guzmán’s Georgia O’Keeffe At Home explores the oeuvre of an American art icon

Famed American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is the focus of Alicia Inez Guzmán’s latest work, Georgia O’Keeffe At Home. Exploring the relationship between O’Keeffe’s location and the work she produced, Guzmán takes readers from Texas, to New York, to New Mexico, in a book that is part beautiful coffee table literature, part in depth art historical study.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: And Fire Came Down by Emma Viskic is a novel about the nature of family and belonging

Author Emma Viskic is an award-winning Australian crime writer, her critically acclaimed debut novel Resurrection Bay won the 2016 Ned Kelly Award for Best First Fiction, as well as many other awards. Not only that but she’s also a classically trained clarinettist, who’s worked with Jose Carreras and Dame Kiri Te Kenawa. Her new novel, And Fire Came Down, is a reflection of modern Australia, including the Indigenous population, and sees Viskic drawing on her own experiences growing up in rural towns and cities. Indeed, Viskic’s in-depth knowledge of Indigenous culture is on show through her characters depictions. There’s racism, and white bogan hooligans, but ultimately it’s all brought together by a sense of family and belonging.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Your Brain Knows More Than You Think is an important & contentious book about pioneering brain research

A book like Your Brain Knows More Than You Think is one that challenges you to leave your assumptions at the door. Originally written by psychologist and neurobiologist Niels Birbaumer, and translated into English by David Shaw, it provides some compelling arguments and case studies from the research and practice undertaken by Birbaumer, and others in this ground-breaking and innovative field. It’s also one that is not without controversy, but that’s because in some cases the stakes can be quite high, especially in trying to achieve things that seem impossible.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Niccolò Ammaniti’s young survivor Anna tackles starvation, gangs & devastating disease in post-apocalyptic Sicily

Several years ago, a virus came to Sicily. It stalked the adults, picking them off one by one, until all that remained was handful of children. Struggling to protect her younger brother, Astor, Anna knows her days are numbered. When she reaches adolescence, the disease will come for her too. Falling in with a boy named Pietro, who believes a specific pair of sneakers will save his life, and a former fighting dog dubbed Fluffy, Anna and Astor aim for the mainland. There must be adults somewhere, after all. Maybe even adults with a cure for the Red Fever.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: The Wisdom of Oz includes funny observations by those true blue wizards of Oz

Australians let us all rejoice for we are a nation full of self-deprecating individuals with a great wit and a keen sense of humour. Never has this been more apparent than in the book, The Wisdom of Oz. This should be required reading for every true blue Aussie (forget the citizenship test) because it’s chock full of excellent pearls of wisdom and pithy comments that encapsulate the profound, the peppery and the profane. It’s the kind of thing that will leave you proud to call Australia home, let’s raise our beers and celebrate.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Stuart Kells’ The Library is a love letter to literature

A leading Australian bibliophile goes on a tour of thousands of libraries. The result isn’t a punchline but in fact a book called The Library by Stuart Kells. This volume is a fascinating text that draws together Kells’ scholarly essays on a range of different topics related to the storage of books, reading in general and different methods of communication through history. It’s an intriguing trip skipping through the history books and hearing about places that are so much more than a mere storeroom. For many people libraries possess a heart and soul and are a delightful sanctuary, a solace and comfort.... Read More | Share it now!