Theatre Review: On Golden Pond – Pavilion Theatre, Castle Hill (Performances until 20th August 2016)

On Golden Pond. Courtesy f The Pavilion Theatre.

Most people are familiar with the story of On Golden Pond, with many having seen the 1981 film starring Henry and Jane Fonda and Katharine Hepburn. The story centres around relationships and families, in particular the dynamic which exists between Norman Thayer, JR (Dave Kirkman), his wife Ethel (Carole Grace) and his estranged daughter Chelsea (Ricarda Emanuel).... Read More | Share it now!

Review: Raiders of the Lost Ark with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra – Sydney Opera House (29.07.16)

This review should probably be premised with the fact that I am a huge fan of the Indiana Jones series (the first three – don’t even get me started on Kingdom of the Crystal Skull). These films formed an intrinsic part of my childhood and are potentially where my love of history steamed from. So it was with much child-like excitement that I arrived at the concert hall at the Sydney Opera House to see Raiders of the Lost Ark with the score played live by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.... Read More | Share it now!

Opera Review: Simon Boccanegra – Sydney Opera House (Performances until 13th August)

Giuseppe Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra presents the tragic story of naval hero Boccanegra (George Petean) who experiences great loss when the mother of his child, Maria, dies. Her father, Jacopo Fiesco (Giacomo Prestia), resents him and insists the only way in which to achieve redemption in his eyes is to hand his granddaughter over to him. Sadly he has no idea what has become of his daughter, who was given to an elderly woman to raise but disappeared after the woman died. In the midst of all this there is political drama as the people of Genoa vote Boccanegra as Doge. As we enter into Act I it is twenty-five years later and things are about to get very complicated.... Read More | Share it now!

Theatre Review: Love, Loss, and What I Wore – Pavilion Theatre, Castle Hill (Performances until 25th June)

Love, Loss, and What I Wore, a play by Nora and Delia Ephron, is based on the 1995 book of the same name by Ilene Beckerman. We are introduced to five women who take it in turns presenting individual, and sometimes joint, monologues. These range from irreverent and funny to painful and heartbreaking, the common theme being their recollection of what they wore.... Read More | Share it now!

Theatre review: The Taming of the Shrew – Sport for Jove, The Seymour Centre (Performances until 28 May 2016)

The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare’s tale of a woman “tamed” by a man, has seen many adaptations over the years, but perhaps none so clever as the latest offering from Sport for Jove. Set in Hollywood during the silent film era of the 1920s, a time of strong women – both on the silver screen and in the streets for women’s Suffrage – we see film star Bianca (Lizzie Schebesta) being fought over by her co-stars Hortensio (Terry Karabelas) and Gremio (Barry French). However, her father Babtista (Robert Alexander) has proclaimed that she will not marry until her elder sister Katharina (Danielle King) is wed first, trouble is she is the most feared of beings – a shrew – and no man will touch her. Hortensio and Gremio are united in their search to find a man to tame the shrew and Hortensio employs the skills of his friend Petruchio (James Lugton) who is keen to wed.... Read More | Share it now!

Theatre review: Blonde Poison – Sydney Opera House (Performances until 12 May 2016)

Close up shot of an older woman's face as she stares at the camera. Image is tinted red.

Directed by Jennifer Hagan and presented by Strange Duck Productions, Blonde Poison is a gripping tale of betrayal, war and the high price of survival. Based on a true story, Stella Goldschlag is preparing to be interviewed in her home by an old childhood friend, now a successful journalist. As she becomes increasingly anxious about his arrival, she begins to reflect on her life, and the decisions which have shaped the person she has become.... Read More | Share it now!

Theatre review: The Game’s Afoot; or Holmes for the Holidays – Pavilion Theatre, Castle Hill (Performances until 30 April 2016)

A group surround a table in a séance.

As the curtain opens you would be forgiven for thinking you had stumbled into the wrong theatre. On stage we see Sherlock Holmes concluding a murder investigation and catching his killer – but how can that be when we are only three minutes in? Here, at the start of the Pavilion Theatre’s The Game’s Afoot; or Holmes for the Holidays, we have the classic ‘a play within a play’ technique. The protagonist, William Gillette (Jason Spindlow) is starring in his own play based on the Sherlock Holmes novels, and as he and the rest of the cast take their bows a shot rings out and he collapses. Fear not, he is perfectly fine, merely a flesh wound but as he recuperates in his mansion which he currently shares with his mother Martha (Elizabeth Gilbert) he is determined to embody the character he so artfully depicted and solve his own attempted murder.... Read More | Share it now!

Arts Review: Mayhem Kings Cross 1945 – Elizabeth Bay House, Sydney (15.02.16)

Black and white image of a woman lounging on a love seat in a gown.

Inspired by events in and around Kings Cross at the end of the Second World War, Mayhem Kings Cross 1945 at the opulent Elizabeth Bay House was a celebration of the end of the war and a way to bid farewell to American GI’s returning home. A coloration between Sydney Living Museums and The Festivalists, guests were encourage to attend decked out in their best 1940s garb or service uniform and explore the stunning rooms of Elizabeth Bay House. There was a secret cellar, admittance only permitted after using the secret code word, where you could view illicit “pornographic” photographs and purchase goods on the black market. In particular, the room set up with a television and headsets where you could view short news reels from the war, was especially interesting.... Read More | Share it now!

Theatre Review: Year of the Family – Kings Cross Theatre (Performances until 20th February)

A homeless man sits in a chair with a woman behind him.

Tooth and Sinew in association with bAKEHOUSE Theatre present Year of the Family, written by Anthony Neilson. This production is an incredibly dark comedy that had me laughing at what could arguably be described as rather inappropriate circumstances. Highlighting how truly dysfunctional families can be, the play follows the relationships of half-sisters Fliss and Claire as they navigate through life one stumble at a time. Year of the Family forces you to question the traditional perceptions of family so often portrayed by the media, and renders the line between ‘normal’ and ‘insane’ rather ambiguously.... Read More | Share it now!