Book Review: Daniel Shand’s Fallow is a wild ride through the Scottish highlands, helmed by an increasingly unstable narrator

Paul and Michael Buchanan are in hiding. Moving from highland village to highland village, the brothers are trying to avoid the press and police surrounding their home after Michael’s release from prison. Convicted of the murder of a little girl when he was a teenager, Michael relies heavily on Paul to source them food and supplies. But Paul is concerned for more than just his younger brother’s well-being, as Fallow slowly reveals that Michael isn’t the one you should be worried about, after all.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Mary Beard explores the ancient roots of modern misogyny in Women & Power: A Manifesto

Drawing on lectures delivered in 2014 and 2017, Women & Power: A Manifesto is a small, yet powerful exploration of the historical silencing of women in the public sphere. The Ancient Roman and Greek cultures we so often hold up as the basis for our democracies today were never particularly kind to the loud woman and as historian Mary Beard argues, neither are we today.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Get inside the head of pop legend Robbie Williams, in Chris Heath’s Reveal

It’s been thirteen years since Feel, music journalist Chris Heath’s first book with singer Robbie Williams. In that time, Williams has married and started a family, rejoined and left Take That, and further cemented his legacy as one of pop’s true superstars by breaking the Guinness World Record for most tour tickets sold in a single day – a staggering 1.6million. Officially the most successful British solo artist of all time, Williams has battled demons throughout his time in the spotlight and now Reveal picks up where the best-selling Feel left off.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: You’ll sleep with the lights on after reading Laura Purcell’s The Silent Companions

Elsie Bainbridge, newly widowed, is sent to her late husband’s estate to see out the last few weeks of her pregnancy. With a skeleton staff, abandoned, dusty rooms, and a surrounding village terrified of the house, The Bridge is far from the haven Elsie hopes it to be. But when she and Sarah, her husband’s cousin, discover a beautiful painted figure behind a locked attic door, things begin to spiral out of control. The figure is not alone and she is not friendly.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Hannah Jewell’s 100 Nasty Women of History will help you find your new favourite historical figure

Join The Washington Post’s pop culture editor Hannah Jewell as she plucks (almost) forgotten women from the historical cutting room floor. From artists to investigative reporters, scientists to queens, political firebrands to murderers, there’s no such thing as the delicate fairer sex here. Get in the kitchen and make you sandwich? Puh-lease. I’ve got an empire to overthrow.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Tackle the taboo with Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson’s F*cked

Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson, the voices behind Guys We Fucked: The Anti-Slut Shaming Podcast, have travelled from the podcast to the page with F*cked: Being Sexually Explorative and Self-Confident in a World That’s Screwed. Put down the rom-com and stick the rosé back in the fridge because you don’t need a man, and Fisher and Hutchinson are ready to tell you why.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Graphic memoir Eyes Too Dry explores mental illness, lasting friendships, and the healing power of art

A true tale of mental illness told from the perspective of both the sufferer and the bewildered friend, Eyes Too Dry is a joint venture from Alice Chipkin and Jessica ‘Tava’ Tavassoli. Switching between Tava, a medical student slipping into a deep depression, and housemate Alice, losing herself in her friend’s darkening struggle, this graphic memoir is an emotional and affecting exploration of mental ill health and its indiscriminate reach and impact.... Read More | Share it now!

Book Review: Immerse yourself in the hunt for Australia’s deadliest snake with Brendan James Murray’s Venom

In the first half of the twentieth century, the Australian media began spreading tales of a huge, lightning fast species of snake that was seemingly taking lives at a rate of knots. Attaining a near mythical status, the nguman, or taipan, was all too real. The press demonised them, wary farmers hunted them, and desperate herpetologists tried to capture them, creating the climate of near hysteria that forms the backbone of Venom, the second book from Australian writer Brendan James Murray.... Read More | Share it now!